social media marketing

Six of the best marketing stories

In Content production by Rob Johnson1 Comment

It’s easy to give social media marketing advice after the dust has settled. The truth is, we all feel a little sympathy for brands when they have the kind of social media day ALDI just had. But while social media is great for conversations with your customers, there are smart ways to handle it.

That’s one of this month’s marketing stories that caught our eye, and you can read about it a bit further down the page.

We also link to some great and smart SEO advice from the Content Marketing Institute. We’ve found some inspiration from famous authors for those content slaves pumping out thousands of words a day. We look at Newscred’s advice for how to pay to get your messages distributed. And finally, some serious and not-very-serious analysis of the jargon we all fall prey to.

You tasted what?

On Jan 27th, supermarket chain ALDI released a little clickbait campaign on Facebook and Twitter. It wasn’t very complicated, but if you read it you could be forgiven for raising an eyebrow. If you loved ALDI, it seemed like a really good idea. But if you were a suspicious type, you would think that they were tempting the trolls.

The campaign simply asked people to fill in the blank in their reply to a card, which read:

“I became an ALDI lover when I tasted (blank) for the first time”.

On Facebook, it looked like a success. People were writing in suggesting their favourite ALDI products. There were a couple of hundred comments after the first couple of hours. It was sweet. Some even wrote in praising ALDI for saving them enough money to buy other branded stuff.

It wasn’t so friendly on Twitter.

Many of the suggestions from the Twitterverse shouldn’t be reprinted. But anyone with a lewd imagination can quickly guess. One of the nicer ones was “I became an Aldi lover when I tasted the bitter tears of a social media idea gone wrong for the first time”. The tweet was removed within a few hours, but not before it attracted a torrent of comment that would make the hardiest brand blush.

It’s a great illustration of the dangers of automating social media. What works perfectly well on one platform can be a disaster on another. But also, if you ask for interaction, you may well get it. Sometimes it’s much safer to see social media as a distribution platform. Use it to engage one-on-one with any commenters.

We’ve written further about social media marketing and how to approach it on yourblogposts.com’s blog.

The medium is not the message

Andy Crestodina is the co-founder of Orbit Media (https://www.orbitmedia.com, a Chicago based web design and development firm. In an interview with Chief Content Officer magazine (the Content Marketing Institute’s magazine), he set about explaining why optimizing your site is really about the psychology of how people interact with it. It’s not about buying a plug-in and tweaking your copy to get a green light (not that he had any particular plug-in in mind).

In the interview, he says: “It’s not really about the tools; it’s what you do with them. Imagine you want more friends in life. Would you say, “I need to get better at communicating. I’m going to buy a better phone?” No. You can’t automate getting new friends. The same is true for growing your audience.”

Crestodina gives solid, sensible, informed advice that distinguishes between the quality of the content itself, and how that content is best promoted.

Inspirational numbers

Yes, we all know that it’s not the number of words you write, but what you do with them. Still, it can be a bit dispiriting to see someone pumping out reams and reams of copy on a daily basis, while you have trouble coming up with a single snappy sentence.

Don’t despair. You are not weird. Your daily word output can compare with some of the greatest writers of all time (and you’re not trying to win a Nobel prize for literature, you’re just blogging). This list from the Writers Write blog lists how many words each writer writes each day.

You can buy love

Yes, your content is brilliant. Yes, the basic principles of an inbound marketing strategy is that you don’t pay all those advertising costs. That leads find you, rather than the other way around.

But even the world’s greatest content producers pay to promote their content. And they don’t just sling $50 to Facebook to get it on their friend’s feeds either. They pay serious money. Hollywood movies, for example, spend up to 60 per cent of its production budget on distribution.

Newscred, to their credit, have produced an interesting rundown of the different options for paid distribution of your content, which is worth checking out. It looks at the different price points for paid content and the various suppliers in this space. As Newscred says, “Even great content needs a push.”

Gibberish, inc.

Finally, have you noticed how content marketing can be a victim of its own jargon? Jay Acunzo wrote about this at the start of the year in his Sorry For Marketing blog, and gives a good, jargon-free definition of content marketing: it is solving the same customer problems as your product, but through media you create and distribute.

In the same vein but funnier, Contently has published a list of regular job descriptions written by marketers. Chefs get rebranded as Dynamic gustatory content creator, teacher as child knowledge converter, and many more.

Want more of this?

If you think this content is valuable, please sign up to our newsletter. It’s a monthly email with three original articles on either content marketing, content strategy or content production. Feel free to use them to make your content, and your content marketing, better and more effective than ever before!

Finally, if you disagree with anything I’ve said here, please feel free to leave a comment. We do read them and comment back, and I’m more than happy to discuss it with you.

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Rob is a director of Engage Content. When not writing about content marketing, he leads a crack team of writers and editors all living a Gen-X fantasy existence in a top secret headquarters in Pyrmont, on Sydney's fashionable western side.

Comments

  1. There are different kinds of marketing strategies but you have to choose carefully what strategy to use. Using it properly will do a great changes in your business. It will make your business a success or not thus every business enthusiast must read about this.

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